This 1967 Plymouth GTX, owned by David Zavetsky, of Wellsboro, PA, was originally a 440, 4-speed, Dana 60 car that the previous owner transformed into the HEMI, 4-speed, Dana 60 GTX seen here.  The previous owner had the complete rusted quarter panels removed by drilling every spot weld and then fitting the NOS quarter panels into place.  All other body panel concerns were addressed and then the deep, rich black paint was applied.

A GTX that will Win You Over

Have you ever met a person that always seems to be in the right place at the right time?  They just seem to always have a smile on their face, a great disposition, and have never ending luck on their side.  When it comes to cars this person always seems to have the cash for a new project even when they already have a current project (or two) and once they find something that catches their interest they have the negotiating skills to close the deal.  David Zavetsky, of Wellsboro, PA, is one such person; he is a successful business man, an accomplished fabricator, a talented road racer, and a family man.


All the factory panels and chrome are in excellent reconditioned shape.  The little “HEMI” badge on the trunk lid lets the unsuspecting public know the seriousness of this GTX.  The subtle red pinstripe down the upper flanks of the GTX really make the black hue pop.  The factory exhaust tips are connected to a manufacturer unknown but well-designed 3” exhaust system.

David’s story begins in 2010 with a search for a HEMI engine for his ’31 Ford coupe.  His search was focused upon a Gen I HEMI engine of the 354 cid or 392 cid variety; he figured that the HEMI would be more than enough engine on the street to motivate his Ford while also providing some nice eye candy for the onlookers as he cruised the PA country side.  Very early in David’s search for an engine a ’67 HEMI GTX popped up on his computer screen; while it caught his attention it was not really what he wanted.  Remember he was looking for a Gen I HEMI, he really did not want a Gen II HEMI, he certainly did not need another project, and the $75K asking price was a little steep.  A year into his search, the GTX consistently showed up and by 2011 the asking price had dropped to $45K.  Fast forward another year and the still unsold GTX’s price tag had dropped again.