Volume III, Issue 9, Page 14

Things we have learned from stock eliminator drag racing so far

At the time of this writing, we have finally fixed all the major glitches and gremlins on our Stock Eliminator Max Wedge car. It's been grueling, expensive, and even humiliating at times, but now the car is consistent, reliable, and fast. Now we can concentrate more on the fine tuning and scientific experimentation that make Stock such an interesting class to be a part of. This seemed like a good time to look back at the lessons that we have learned and share some of them with you. 

1. DON’T DO IT! We tell this to our friends all the time. Just don't do it. I'm serious. Don't. It looks easy. It looks hard. Whatever. Don't do it. It's addictive like heroin. It gets into your brain like sex. You get used to the fact that no one, not even other drag racers will understand what the heck you're talking or thinking about. Large quantities of money get burned like a fire at the bank. The rules change all the time. Tech is like having the house assessed for a new bank loan (you'll need to do that anyways to cover the fuel bill from towing to Canada and Southern California). 

2. MOPAR DESIGNED SOME SERIOUSLY BAD ASS MACHINERY! They just didn't build it very well and what they did build was mass produced and usually subjected to the hell of driving on the street for decades. If everything in a given Mopar is machined and assembled to exact original specifications it can be as fast or faster than any other car that is subjected to the same rules. 

3. NHRA STOCK RACING IS VERY EXPENSIVE. Machining and assembling a Mopar (or a Chevy or a Ford) to original factory specifications, plus allowed deviations, is like funding the construction of your own custom jet helicopter. 

4. NHRA STOCK RACING IS A LOT OF WORK. Machining and assembling a Mopar (or a Ford or a Chevy) to original factory specifications, plus allowed deviations, is like building your own custom jet helicopter. 

Here's What's New!